Too Old To Start A Legal Career?

“But am I too old?”

At what age do you become, old? I’ve heard people at 27,37, 47 and beyond, mutter these words when deciding whether to embark upon a career in law.

There are multiple different ways to get in to the legal profession, which all in turn emit different timescales. My personal view is, that if I wished to instruct Counsel or a Solicitor, or any other legal professional for that matter, I would prefer someone who tends to be older than myself, perhaps has the image of authority and working experience. Now, that’s not to say there are I’m sure, many cracking lawyers out there whom wipe the floor in the courtroom with their opposing Counsel, it is not to undermine the younger intellects of The Open University. It is however, to give reassurance to those a bit older, a bit wiser and whom may be holding back, essentially out of fear.

I’m not sure whether it is a delightful prospect, but the retirement age is rising. People are, whether they like to acknowledge it or not, working longer. There is a space for you.

The BBC produced an article back in 2017, showcasing Craigan at the grand age of 84 at the time of writing and Maureen, being 79 embarking on their law degree. They make it clear that their ages do not act as barriers and they seek to achieve the same aspirational goals they had previously when they were younger. Maureen states “All older people are capable of being up for a challenge. They’ve been through life where they’ve had to meet many challenges.” [1]

Maureen and Craigan, also are keen to point out that there is no upper age limit when accessing Student Finance, which helps to aid access to education for everyone.

At any age, a person is remarkable, a person whom believes in themselves, with the right work ethic and determination, really is, unstoppable. You can do this, irrespective of whatever it is mentally that makes you feel that you aren’t good enough

Written By: Laurie-Elizabeth Ketley

[1] https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-41573213

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